The Sanctity of Social Media?

Quite a firestorm (or teapot tempest) yesterday over this. I’m not going to bludgeon the issue, because There have been so many posts already…point, counterpoint…and I doubt I can add anything original to that discussion. And I’ll let Chris’ own outstanding response speak for itself, since I’d gather you’re all reading him anyway.

But the underlying issue to me is this idea that social media mechanisms like blogs are somehow sacrosanct, hallowed ground. That there is no room for commercialism within the walls of the Almighty Conversation. That the only use for these tools in within the confines of personal expression, removed from a capitalistic context. That simply isn’t the case. Blogs are tools, and not those that only serve a singular purpose.

Social Media in Business

If we’re continue to argue that social media is viable within a business framework, there’s no way to keep the peas from touching the mashed potatoes.You’re in business to make money. Ultimately, your use of social media channels is intended to forge stronger relationships with customers in support of the long term goal of driving business success (read: money). It’s that simple. Just because the line between the two is dotted doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. It would be a patent waste of time otherwise.

Social media and capitalism are not mutually exclusive. Social media is an idea, a culture. It’s about transparency of business relationships, and a willingness to allow and encourage the ensuing conversation. (Incidentally, no one mentioned the huge risk that Izea and KMart took here…Chris could have written a scathing review just as easily. If he had, would we then be criticizing him for using his influence to damage a company’s reputation?). The communication is the foundation. The rest (including the monetization) is built upon that, first.

Truth and Trust

The difference between promotion of the craptastic kind and a sponsored blog post is immense. Craptastic promotion reeks of subterfuge and manipulation. It’s an opinion that’s paid for, like a paid endorsement of life insurance by a has-been game show host. It’s not credible, it’s not real, and it’s insulting to the audience. And a blog post in this same vein would equate.

But someone sponsors a post for a review of a product or service. The conclusion is undrawn – that’s up to the blogger. The blogger discloses the relationship, checks stuff out, writes up an opinion, the community decides how to respond. The WalMart Moms do this. There are any number of paid review sites where bloggers receive products or compensation for simply writing their conclusions. Companies like K-Mart are doing their best to reach out to the community to render their open and honest opinions to raise visibility for their company, and I for one think their promotion was savvy and well played to the right audience. Why isn’t this the same as hiring someone for an hour of consulting and asking for their conclusions?

The root of evil in social media is not that money changes hands. It’s when money changes hands for the purposes of “buying” an opinion. The inauthentic line is not that someone is compensated for using their medium or influence to transmit a message – we’ve been doing that since the dawn of business (there’s a reason charities use celebrity spokespeople). It’s not inauthentic to compensate someone to render an opinion. Inauthentic is only achieved when there is a lack of transparency about the existence of the arrangement, and/or a definitive move to purchase the ensuing conclusions.

Why are we so predisposed to believe that a positive review is bought or unduly influenced? It’s insulting to the general population to assume that individuals are incapable of drawing an independent conclusion in the face of compensation. And are we seriously trying to say that influence can only be used for altruistic versus capitalistic purposes, even if that business relationship is front and center for all to see? Is there no room for leadership, for stronger voices here? If not, doesn’t that miss the point of the power of dialogue in the first place?

Proof

We talk a lot about ROI. About proving the worth of social media in business and demonstrating that it can move the needle. In this particular case, success was visible. People talked about the promotion, they participated. The sponsor was happy. They didn’t buy an opinion, they bought the spotlight (and the risk that went along with it), and the community did the rest. And they opened up their brand to an open-ended conversation and hoped to reach new audiences, which I’d argue they did.  You want ROI? There you go.

What’s Next?

Social media’s beauty is not in stifling the growth of business, removing monetary elements, or even the individual success (or compensation) of those behind blogs. It is in changing the visibility around and within those dialogues so that everyone knows where they stand and can make their own educated, individual choices about how to further that business relationship.

Blogs are opt-in. Something not for you? Prefer a blog that’s the result of someone’s free time instead of their livelihood? You can find one.  Personally, I will always support the ability for bloggers to occasionally focus their compensated attention on one company or product if it means that their outstanding unpaid content will be there for me to digest for some time to come. Not your thing? Use the voice that social media gave you to say so and opt out. It’s pretty darn easy to skip over a post.

Not all social media endeavors will survive without some kind of underwriting, and there’s credit due to those who are putting their own influence to the test to see how and when that works for those without the resources to test such. The “rules”, if you will, are still being written, and they will forever be evolving. Let’s put some of our collective trust in the community we so believe in, and contribute to finding positive and constructive ways for social media and business to combine (with a little tolerance thrown in for good measure, please).

Photo credit: Tim Parkinson

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  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @awolk: actually, Alan, it’s a great differentiator (who’d a thunk it?). Blogs that run paid posts and those that won’t run paid posts–and/or ad-free blogs.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @awolk: actually, Alan, it’s a great differentiator (who’d a thunk it?). Blogs that run paid posts and those that won’t run paid posts–and/or ad-free blogs.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @Amber: oh you (and Mack and Alan) are very patient with me. Folks, I’m really trying to be more “open and balanced” while my soul yells “don’t let this beautiful medium get polluted!” My focus–and Mack has been saying this lots–is that there are better ways to leverage social media for brand awareness/advocacy/customer service/communications. The Sci-Fi and CNN programs (which would take far too long to cover here) were great. So that is where my focus is. I will continue to say that everyone is allowed to monetize how they want and I love that everyone has that right…but PPP (and its uglier cousin magpie) are not models that I endorse. I feel we marketers can do so much better. Thanks so much…stepping off soapbox now.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @Amber: oh you (and Mack and Alan) are very patient with me. Folks, I’m really trying to be more “open and balanced” while my soul yells “don’t let this beautiful medium get polluted!” My focus–and Mack has been saying this lots–is that there are better ways to leverage social media for brand awareness/advocacy/customer service/communications. The Sci-Fi and CNN programs (which would take far too long to cover here) were great. So that is where my focus is. I will continue to say that everyone is allowed to monetize how they want and I love that everyone has that right…but PPP (and its uglier cousin magpie) are not models that I endorse. I feel we marketers can do so much better. Thanks so much…stepping off soapbox now.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

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  • http://tangerinetoad.blogspot.com Alan Wolk

    @CK – we’re making the same point here – the handful of blog-like websites that are big enough to attract national advertisers have likely moved into the category of “online magazine” and more power to them if they can make real money from ads that actually match their content.

    The other 99% of us have to decide whether the extra $15/month running what are essentially spam ads on our blogs is worth it. And you lay out correct guidelines for doing so.

    But the content of the blog will likely determine what your answer is going to be: if your content isn’t that far removed from spam, ads for instant hair replacement gels are not really a bother.

    Alan Wolks last blog post..Odds & Ends

  • http://tangerinetoad.blogspot.com Alan Wolk

    @CK – we’re making the same point here – the handful of blog-like websites that are big enough to attract national advertisers have likely moved into the category of “online magazine” and more power to them if they can make real money from ads that actually match their content.

    The other 99% of us have to decide whether the extra $15/month running what are essentially spam ads on our blogs is worth it. And you lay out correct guidelines for doing so.

    But the content of the blog will likely determine what your answer is going to be: if your content isn’t that far removed from spam, ads for instant hair replacement gels are not really a bother.

    Alan Wolks last blog post..Odds & Ends

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @Alan: Yes, those are ads to the side (not mixed with content)on online mags. The $15/monthly are those annoying google ads? Well, at least they’re to the side–the worst is when they’re between the end of the content and the comments (have you seen that?). Those make me not comment on blogs becuz they wreck the experience as I can’t find the comment box. Seems marketers would know to treat their readers better in those cases.

    And in some cases it takes so long to load the darn page because of all the flash in the ads. I actually stopped reading 2 blogs becuz of that and in the comments the readers were griping at the writer for selling-out her site. Funny.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @Alan: Yes, those are ads to the side (not mixed with content)on online mags. The $15/monthly are those annoying google ads? Well, at least they’re to the side–the worst is when they’re between the end of the content and the comments (have you seen that?). Those make me not comment on blogs becuz they wreck the experience as I can’t find the comment box. Seems marketers would know to treat their readers better in those cases.

    And in some cases it takes so long to load the darn page because of all the flash in the ads. I actually stopped reading 2 blogs becuz of that and in the comments the readers were griping at the writer for selling-out her site. Funny.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • Pingback: Did Chris Brogan sell out? | Strive Notes

  • http://thesocialnet.blogspot.com mark

    Geez ppl–this type of navel gazing is why social media faces so many challenges as a legitimate marketing tool.

    I’ve been in this field for 10 years and have to say that if you’re *really* upset over Chris’s blog post, (as opposed to just feeling like you need to exercise a little grey matter) you definitely fall in the category of people who need to get a real life.

    Let’s review:

    1. He wrote a blog post about a K-Mart shopping spree. Just like lots of magazines, newspapers and tv stations do around this time of year.

    That’s the “media” part.

    2. He then asked the question “what would YOU get if you had a $500 KMart gift card?”

    That’s the “social” part.

    What gives ANYONE the right to tell Chris what he should or should not do on HIS blog?

    If you don’t like what he did, fine. Stop reading his blog.

    Really, it’s these endless tempest in a teapot discussions that make businesses afraid of engaging their customers via social media, which is what we SAY we want them to do.

    Because as it turns out, it seems that some of their customers really don’t have anything better to do than create a controversy just for the heck of it.

    It’s Chris’s blog. He can do whatever he wants with it. If you don’t like it, that’s your right.

    But this endless discussion of “was he right in doing what he did?” and some false guideline of “how one SHOULD” monetize a site…that’s just nonsense.

    There is no one “right” way to do things, and no “one size fits all” solutions for engaging people for fun and profit.

    Whatever works, works. If it doesn’t, try something else. Failure isn’t bad–nobody dies because a marketing campaign didn’t go as hoped for.

    If IZEA was happy with the entry, that’s what matters. They paid for it. If you’re not happy with IZEA, then stop shopping at KMart.

    Really. It’s. Not. That. Complicated.

    marks last blog post..What do Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich, Britney Spears and Christmas all have in common?

  • http://thesocialnet.blogspot.com mark

    Geez ppl–this type of navel gazing is why social media faces so many challenges as a legitimate marketing tool.

    I’ve been in this field for 10 years and have to say that if you’re *really* upset over Chris’s blog post, (as opposed to just feeling like you need to exercise a little grey matter) you definitely fall in the category of people who need to get a real life.

    Let’s review:

    1. He wrote a blog post about a K-Mart shopping spree. Just like lots of magazines, newspapers and tv stations do around this time of year.

    That’s the “media” part.

    2. He then asked the question “what would YOU get if you had a $500 KMart gift card?”

    That’s the “social” part.

    What gives ANYONE the right to tell Chris what he should or should not do on HIS blog?

    If you don’t like what he did, fine. Stop reading his blog.

    Really, it’s these endless tempest in a teapot discussions that make businesses afraid of engaging their customers via social media, which is what we SAY we want them to do.

    Because as it turns out, it seems that some of their customers really don’t have anything better to do than create a controversy just for the heck of it.

    It’s Chris’s blog. He can do whatever he wants with it. If you don’t like it, that’s your right.

    But this endless discussion of “was he right in doing what he did?” and some false guideline of “how one SHOULD” monetize a site…that’s just nonsense.

    There is no one “right” way to do things, and no “one size fits all” solutions for engaging people for fun and profit.

    Whatever works, works. If it doesn’t, try something else. Failure isn’t bad–nobody dies because a marketing campaign didn’t go as hoped for.

    If IZEA was happy with the entry, that’s what matters. They paid for it. If you’re not happy with IZEA, then stop shopping at KMart.

    Really. It’s. Not. That. Complicated.

    marks last blog post..What do Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich, Britney Spears and Christmas all have in common?

  • http://www.budgetpulse.com Craig

    Of course this will always come into question. This isn’t the first industry to do so. Many fans of bands complain when their bands “sellout” for more money. Well the truth is they need the money to survive, and in bloggers cases, may be true as well. Regardless if just for fun or for a business, there should still be ethics involved. A reader can make of their own opinion about a blogger and like you mention, can opt-in or out at will, so it’s their decision, not anyone elses.

  • http://www.budgetpulse.com Craig

    Of course this will always come into question. This isn’t the first industry to do so. Many fans of bands complain when their bands “sellout” for more money. Well the truth is they need the money to survive, and in bloggers cases, may be true as well. Regardless if just for fun or for a business, there should still be ethics involved. A reader can make of their own opinion about a blogger and like you mention, can opt-in or out at will, so it’s their decision, not anyone elses.

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    Many fans of bands complain when their bands “sellout” for more money. Well the truth is they need the money to survive, and in bloggers cases, may be true as well. Regardless if just for fun or for a business, there should still be ethics involved.

    @Craig: good point. My question is this: do the bands stop writing about, say, the human condition and start writing songs about a big-box retailer? Because if so, I would agree those bands have sold out their art (and their fans will leave them). Many times a band can get a label to back their art and then do sponsorships “on the side” (like, say, being a celebrity spokesperson for a product where they appear in commercials, or the logos are present at their concerts on signs and t-shirts). But the band’s lyrics and style do not change. So it doesn’t affect their content or style and fans still love ‘em.

    @Amber & Alan: regarding my “noise” concern from way up above in the comments; I’ve visited several blogs today and a handful of them are promoting Sears and KMart (which I believe have now merged). Now, granted, Sears and KMart are not applicable to me… but it just feels like a lotta ads being thrust at me as “content” and even though the posts are different and the bloggers put a lot of time into them, I come away with “oh, another paid-post ad.” Thus, noisy.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    Many fans of bands complain when their bands “sellout” for more money. Well the truth is they need the money to survive, and in bloggers cases, may be true as well. Regardless if just for fun or for a business, there should still be ethics involved.

    @Craig: good point. My question is this: do the bands stop writing about, say, the human condition and start writing songs about a big-box retailer? Because if so, I would agree those bands have sold out their art (and their fans will leave them). Many times a band can get a label to back their art and then do sponsorships “on the side” (like, say, being a celebrity spokesperson for a product where they appear in commercials, or the logos are present at their concerts on signs and t-shirts). But the band’s lyrics and style do not change. So it doesn’t affect their content or style and fans still love ‘em.

    @Amber & Alan: regarding my “noise” concern from way up above in the comments; I’ve visited several blogs today and a handful of them are promoting Sears and KMart (which I believe have now merged). Now, granted, Sears and KMart are not applicable to me… but it just feels like a lotta ads being thrust at me as “content” and even though the posts are different and the bloggers put a lot of time into them, I come away with “oh, another paid-post ad.” Thus, noisy.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.budgetpulse.com Craig

    @CK I disagree with you. Of course bands change their style and sound, prob lyrics as well. They may change from a harder more indie sound to a more commercial pop sound that is more radio friendly. And in a lot of cases I agree with them, because the new sound is actually a lot better.

    I think you need to have your own moral ethics and things you stand up for. But when someone is waving a check in your face to change, and it’s your livelihood at stake, you can’t argue against their reasonings. Just playing devils advocate

    You could say the same with authors. They create a great book then sell the rights away for money and the movie sucks and isn’t even the same as the book.

  • http://www.budgetpulse.com Craig

    @CK I disagree with you. Of course bands change their style and sound, prob lyrics as well. They may change from a harder more indie sound to a more commercial pop sound that is more radio friendly. And in a lot of cases I agree with them, because the new sound is actually a lot better.

    I think you need to have your own moral ethics and things you stand up for. But when someone is waving a check in your face to change, and it’s your livelihood at stake, you can’t argue against their reasonings. Just playing devils advocate

    You could say the same with authors. They create a great book then sell the rights away for money and the movie sucks and isn’t even the same as the book.

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @Craig: thanks. I think finessing one’s style or prose (like a publisher does) to align with an audience is different than all of a sudden writing an entire song about a retailer. But I get your argument. For instance, I’ve hired an Editor before to help me with pieces of thought leadership and while the content and message was the same, he very much helped me to be clearer and more concise so as to ensure more value for my readers.

    What’s most interesting to me is when you say they sell the rights away and then the movie sucks. That happens all too often and why I’m very leery when others sell like with PPP models. I see it as too big a risk to content quality and trust(and suggest other models of monetizing that don’t interfere with content). Thanks for talking it with me.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://www.ck-blog.com CK

    @Craig: thanks. I think finessing one’s style or prose (like a publisher does) to align with an audience is different than all of a sudden writing an entire song about a retailer. But I get your argument. For instance, I’ve hired an Editor before to help me with pieces of thought leadership and while the content and message was the same, he very much helped me to be clearer and more concise so as to ensure more value for my readers.

    What’s most interesting to me is when you say they sell the rights away and then the movie sucks. That happens all too often and why I’m very leery when others sell like with PPP models. I see it as too big a risk to content quality and trust(and suggest other models of monetizing that don’t interfere with content). Thanks for talking it with me.

    CKs last blog post..Inspiration from the factory floor…

  • http://blog.izea.com Carri

    Hi Amber!
    I enjoyed your post and thank you for your thoughtful analysis. As I work for IZEA, I have a bit of a different perspective on this.
    Firt, IZEA is the umbrella company for PayPerPost, CloudShout, IzeaRanks, and SocialSpark among others.
    SocialSpark is the company through which the KMart campaign was run. SocialSpark requires all links to be no-follow which got us a thumbs up from Google and includes disclosure for ALL posts (as does PayPerPost for the record).
    In fact, IZEA’s commitment to transparency and disclosure is the major factor in our becoming a Governing member of WOMMA (Word of Mouth Marketing Association).
    Having read the majority of coverage on this, I think the real issue is that people are looking at a whole new game and trying to play by the old rules.
    Blogs are NOT print ads and bloggers are NOT journalists. As such, you cannot expect them to behave in the same way.
    Also, believing that blogging is sacrosanct and that bloggers should be “pure” of advertorial or advertising content is naive.
    Advertisers and marketers reach people by going to where the conversation is taking place. From traveling salesmen to billboards to Google Ads, the basic idea is the same. Advertisers want to be where they can get their product in front of the most people they possibly can.
    Increasingly, conversations are taking place online. There are currently more than 1.6 BILLION people on the internet Worldwide. Smart advertisers realize this and even smarter ones recognize that the game is changing from simply telling people about your products to being able to interact and converse with your consumer base to create brand awareness and brand evangelists.
    KMart had the foresight to recognize that in order to become an active part of the conversation and jump right back into being relevant, it needed to be exposed in new ways to a new audience.
    The KMart campaign was EXTREMELY successful in that it got people discussing KMart, whether good or bad. It essentially put KMart back on the map.
    Of course, this is just the beginning. This campaign has given KMart a leg up, but they have to now take the ball and run with it. They need to capitalize on this buzz and engage with the consumers in this space.
    What the rest of us need to do is to take a deep breath and realize that sponsored content (or paid posts or whatever semantic interpretation makes you comfortable) are not going away and it would behoove us all to create and agree on a code of standards and ethics for this new medium, based on the parameters OF the new medium and not rely on outmoded ‘standards’ that are no longer relevant in this context.

    All the Best,
    Carri Bright
    IZEA Communications

    Carris last blog post..”Twitter Tips” Week One Winner

  • http://blog.izea.com Carri

    Hi Amber!
    I enjoyed your post and thank you for your thoughtful analysis. As I work for IZEA, I have a bit of a different perspective on this.
    Firt, IZEA is the umbrella company for PayPerPost, CloudShout, IzeaRanks, and SocialSpark among others.
    SocialSpark is the company through which the KMart campaign was run. SocialSpark requires all links to be no-follow which got us a thumbs up from Google and includes disclosure for ALL posts (as does PayPerPost for the record).
    In fact, IZEA’s commitment to transparency and disclosure is the major factor in our becoming a Governing member of WOMMA (Word of Mouth Marketing Association).
    Having read the majority of coverage on this, I think the real issue is that people are looking at a whole new game and trying to play by the old rules.
    Blogs are NOT print ads and bloggers are NOT journalists. As such, you cannot expect them to behave in the same way.
    Also, believing that blogging is sacrosanct and that bloggers should be “pure” of advertorial or advertising content is naive.
    Advertisers and marketers reach people by going to where the conversation is taking place. From traveling salesmen to billboards to Google Ads, the basic idea is the same. Advertisers want to be where they can get their product in front of the most people they possibly can.
    Increasingly, conversations are taking place online. There are currently more than 1.6 BILLION people on the internet Worldwide. Smart advertisers realize this and even smarter ones recognize that the game is changing from simply telling people about your products to being able to interact and converse with your consumer base to create brand awareness and brand evangelists.
    KMart had the foresight to recognize that in order to become an active part of the conversation and jump right back into being relevant, it needed to be exposed in new ways to a new audience.
    The KMart campaign was EXTREMELY successful in that it got people discussing KMart, whether good or bad. It essentially put KMart back on the map.
    Of course, this is just the beginning. This campaign has given KMart a leg up, but they have to now take the ball and run with it. They need to capitalize on this buzz and engage with the consumers in this space.
    What the rest of us need to do is to take a deep breath and realize that sponsored content (or paid posts or whatever semantic interpretation makes you comfortable) are not going away and it would behoove us all to create and agree on a code of standards and ethics for this new medium, based on the parameters OF the new medium and not rely on outmoded ‘standards’ that are no longer relevant in this context.

    All the Best,
    Carri Bright
    IZEA Communications

    Carris last blog post..”Twitter Tips” Week One Winner

  • http://www.1115media.com Michael Buechele

    As long as there is disclosure and the product or service is a good fit for the community that the blogger represents, I don’t see a problem with it. I think it’s very much like a celebrity endorsement but with much more credibility since it’s disclosed. I think he’s still credible since he’s not pulling the wool over his community’s eyes. He’s not bringing vegans into a Burger King, he’s showing Kmart toys on a blog for Dads.

    The posts are segregated from the other content because they are marked as paid posts. They are the commercials displaying relevant content to the community. You don’t expect to see a baby food commercial during a monster truck TV show, in the same way you shouldn’t expect to read a paid post about men’s suits on a women’s basketball blog. Banner advertising had led to banner blindness and publisher inventory is losing value every day. An alternative needs to be found and I think the marked disclosed paid post is good alternative.

    Michael Buecheles last blog post..IZEA, Chris Brogan, Disclosure, and Community Trust

  • http://www.1115media.com Michael Buechele

    As long as there is disclosure and the product or service is a good fit for the community that the blogger represents, I don’t see a problem with it. I think it’s very much like a celebrity endorsement but with much more credibility since it’s disclosed. I think he’s still credible since he’s not pulling the wool over his community’s eyes. He’s not bringing vegans into a Burger King, he’s showing Kmart toys on a blog for Dads.

    The posts are segregated from the other content because they are marked as paid posts. They are the commercials displaying relevant content to the community. You don’t expect to see a baby food commercial during a monster truck TV show, in the same way you shouldn’t expect to read a paid post about men’s suits on a women’s basketball blog. Banner advertising had led to banner blindness and publisher inventory is losing value every day. An alternative needs to be found and I think the marked disclosed paid post is good alternative.

    Michael Buecheles last blog post..IZEA, Chris Brogan, Disclosure, and Community Trust

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  • http://www.datexmedia.wordpress.com Scott Mahler

    I’m so glad somebody pointed this out. Yes, social media is about being “social,” but just like networking in person involves personal conversation, we all know everybody is there to market themselves, company and/or products. I want to get to know people on a more personal level, after all, the more you know about your clients, the better you are at serving them, but discussing business should not be taboo. Sometimes I feel like I’d be a pirahnna just for mentioning my company’s name. Thanks for clarifying this issues.

    Scott Mahlers last blog post..Internet Marketing For Your Website: Tips On How It’s Done

  • http://www.datexmedia.wordpress.com Scott Mahler

    I’m so glad somebody pointed this out. Yes, social media is about being “social,” but just like networking in person involves personal conversation, we all know everybody is there to market themselves, company and/or products. I want to get to know people on a more personal level, after all, the more you know about your clients, the better you are at serving them, but discussing business should not be taboo. Sometimes I feel like I’d be a pirahnna just for mentioning my company’s name. Thanks for clarifying this issues.

    Scott Mahlers last blog post..Internet Marketing For Your Website: Tips On How It’s Done

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    A lot of social media is turning from quality content of strong real relationships into a mass of advertising and spam such as on Facebook, i feel. I hope Facebook can distinguish more clearly between friends and businesses and not intermingle the two so confusingly.

    Tom Gurneys last blog post..The Kiss Poster

  • http://thekissklimt.wordpress.com Tom Gurney

    A lot of social media is turning from quality content of strong real relationships into a mass of advertising and spam such as on Facebook, i feel. I hope Facebook can distinguish more clearly between friends and businesses and not intermingle the two so confusingly.

    Tom Gurneys last blog post..The Kiss Poster

  • http://www.sellpoloshirts.com burberry polos

    A lot of social media is turning from quality content of strong real relationships into a mass of advertising and spam such as on Facebook, i feel.

  • http://www.sellpoloshirts.com burberry polos

    A lot of social media is turning from quality content of strong real relationships into a mass of advertising and spam such as on Facebook, i feel.

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