• http://rickcaffeinated.com Rick Stilwell

    Not real big on the “great job” comments – but wow, this one hits it out of the park. Timely and spot on for me – in case no one else gets it. Thanks for that.

  • http://rickcaffeinated.com Rick Stilwell

    Not real big on the “great job” comments – but wow, this one hits it out of the park. Timely and spot on for me – in case no one else gets it. Thanks for that.

  • http://www.socialmediatalent.com Jim Durbin

    I like that.  Not everyone has to be in Social Media, but every employee should be aware of it.  It’s frankly the only way companies can hope to keep up with the public.  

  • http://www.socialmediatalent.com Jim Durbin

    I like that.  Not everyone has to be in Social Media, but every employee should be aware of it.  It’s frankly the only way companies can hope to keep up with the public.  

  • Omochan

    I’m in the middle of this process right now and about 3/4th of where I had to start was “What is Twitter?” and then had to make steps forward from there.

    I’m trying to get everyone on board, but most of my time is spent on the why this is important and how is this used and how do we use this to connect to people from the perspective of what you do here and what is okay to say/do and not say/do on this.

    To say that someone needs to own this process is an understatement and that was our biggest problem. In my own way, I’m starting to pick up ownership of this process. It’s a lot of thinking and planning and meeting and butting heads, but it will be worth it when we are able to engage and interact with other people in an organized way.

    In short: this post awesome!!!!oneoneone11111 kthxluvubai

  • http://twitter.com/katieherbst Katie Herbst

    When we started our social media efforts, we had a half-day leadership forum on the opportunities and risks involved with social media.  This proved extremely helpful to generate support for dedicating resources to identifying and managing both the good and the bad parts of social media.  Later we created a voluntary online course for employees that cover many of the points you listed above in “What to Include.”  We’re getting ready to evaluate what needs to be updated and also discuss whether this should be mandatory training.  I’ve also found that a lot of the internal education is grassroots. I’ve been speaking at meetings, and informally talking with people in the context of various projects for the past few years, and that’s helped tremendously.  I’m interested to hear from others whether their training is mandatory for all employees.  Thanks for a great post!

    • http://twitter.com/tombrownjr Tom Brown

      Nice Katie.  I would be very interested in looking at what you developed for the voluntary online course.

      I think there should be a mandatory training for all employees along the lines of an introductory “This is Social Media is and we are going to dive in as a company” type training.  The end of the training should ask for people that are interested in helping the company in this endeavor.  Whether they have their own Facebook account or Twitter, it would be a good idea to get their feed back and experiences.

  • Anonymous

    As the Director of Digital Education this is my daily struggle. A key challenge for me is trying to bridge the rather profound chasm between digital practitioners and those who don’t either don’t see the point, or don’t think it impacts them.  

    With the former I ask for support and patience as we try to lift the IQ of the company as a whole (and hopefully make their “digital” jobs easier!); and with the later, I seem to be most successful when I can tie social media to a utilitarian POV, matching either a business objective, or personal hobby to a tool: “Let me show you how Facebook comments can lead to consumer insights!”// “You surf? Let me show you how Twitter will give you a daily update of surf conditions.”It still amazes me that 15+ years in the digital arena and I am still trying to convince people of it’s importance – and incredible potential. Having said that, it’s also amazing to watch the lightbulb of wonder go off when someone finally gets it. 

  • http://www.daveduarte.co.za Dave Duarte

    Hi Amber, excellent piece. I have recently been appointed by Ogilvy South Africa to head up the Ogilvy Digital Marketing Academy ( http://www.ogilvydma.com/about/ ) – we’ve just started, and have a long way to go, but we’ve already learned some lessons, here are just a few:

    1. You need to make it super-practical for busy people – project-based learning is best
    2. Simple game dynamics can increase participation massively
    3. It’s best to work with cross-functional teams to allow for diversity of insight and to ensure that collaboration can be enabled on social media initiatives
    4. Starting with senior leaders and hot talent makes the course more attractive

     I’ve also been running university courses for senior leaders on Social Media (the latest is called Nomadic Leadership http://www.gsb.uct.ac.za/nomadic ).

  • http://www.youintegrate.com Kneale Mann

    Everyone in your organization uses a phone and – I’m guessing – sits on a chair. Social media are different things to many people all of which will touch all of us eventually. I remember having a heated discussion with my boss over 20 years ago about getting a fax machine. His reply “let’s wait for everyone else to get one.” Social is here to stay because it was here before we got here. The tools and training and buy-in is where the work resides.

  • http://techkik.com Amrita Mathur

    In a B2B context, all employees at a company need to be engaged in the social media initiative. Engaged doesn’t mean actively participate… It can mean observe, listen and report if necessary. Anything less means employees don’t know or understand your brand and hence aren’t invested in popularizing it — a situation you def want to avoid.

  • KevinMGreen

    The success of any social media training hinges on identifying natural social behaviors and tailoring your training directly to where individuals will have success.  Training 10,000 people how to use Twitter and Facebook is only valuable if they are willing to take the time to expirement and find value in the practice for themselves.  Dflyonthefly is exactly right to focus on individual interests and passions to get people engaged.  To succeed, employees need to know:

    - Why is this important to me?
    - Why is this important to the company?
    - What role can I play?
    - What am I allowed to say?
    - How do I want to represent myself?
    - How do I want to represent my company?

    The list goes on and on, but providing a Twitter 101 seminar will only get people familiar with the tools.  Once they are trained, the challenge is keeping them passionate about what they are doing,  rewarding them for their participation, and making sure that they aren’t just pushing corporate messaging into conversations.

    It’s also imperative that brands continue to monitor this activity and enable employees to grow.  For most organization, after the Twitter 101 is done, the training stops and little tracking is done to ensure adoption.  Without this, what long term value does the training have?

    You can add gamification and all sorts of other “tricks” to keep them engaged, but does this practice encourage real engagement or is it promoting quantity over quality? 

  • http://www.francis-moran.com Francis Moran

    We blogged yesterday about the value of ensuring that the personal skill set of high-value employees like vice presidents of sales and marketing is converted into institutional knowledge. Your post, Amber, is very much in this same vein. (You can read our post here: http://francis-moran.com/index.php/uncategorized/wheres-your-next-vp-of-sales-or-marketing-coming-from/)

    Within our own small firm, where knowledge transfer is easily done by osmosis, we still have formal mechanisms in place to make sure that we capture individual learning episodes as institutional knowledge. Key among these processes is our use of a wiki, where everything one of us learns is written up so as to be available to the next person who has to do the same job.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you! It’s easy to go down the road of teaching the tools themselves, and forget to give the overall vision and strategy.  Good reminder…

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jamie-Favreau/712406420 Jamie Favreau

    I love this.  I have presented an executive summary to the EVP of the organization I eat, sleep and breathe on a regular basis.  I explained these points and they have a SM manager but they also have two different staffs which don’t always get all the information the full time staff does.  If you were to give them the key information so it could be shared.  The message would be shared by evangelists who often love the organization just as much as the full time but aren’t given credit.  

    This problem is often a big one especially in the sports industry due to having a part time staff for events who often talks to the passionate consumer and the full time staff.  I have worked for three different sports leagues and this is the main problem.
    The more the part time staff knows about marketing objectives, some of the media stuff and other things the more educated they can be sharing the message and this is part of social media as well.  I am a believer in this and thanks for the post.  I thought it would have been a great way for me to break into the organization but it seems to be a long process.  

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jamie-Favreau/712406420 Jamie Favreau

    I love this.  I have presented an executive summary to the EVP of the organization I eat, sleep and breathe on a regular basis.  I explained these points and they have a SM manager but they also have two different staffs which don’t always get all the information the full time staff does.  If you were to give them the key information so it could be shared.  The message would be shared by evangelists who often love the organization just as much as the full time but aren’t given credit.  

    This problem is often a big one especially in the sports industry due to having a part time staff for events who often talks to the passionate consumer and the full time staff.  I have worked for three different sports leagues and this is the main problem.
    The more the part time staff knows about marketing objectives, some of the media stuff and other things the more educated they can be sharing the message and this is part of social media as well.  I am a believer in this and thanks for the post.  I thought it would have been a great way for me to break into the organization but it seems to be a long process.  

  • http://www.icheapmarketing.com iCheap Marketing & Design

    Amber, as you started this post and discussed about Dell’s social media strategy i’m agreed they are having very potential social media strategy and their content is very unique but generic. Whenever i participated in the discussions within the business community of social media stars and prospects i have focus on the content you’re posting/updating because it is very important that you’ve internal education/awareness within your company/marketing departments because now we’re not running TV ads we’re directly interacting with our targeted audience.

  • http://www.thefourthrevolution.org Jeremie Averous

    Amber, this post is really spot on! Efforts to implement social networks stumble on a lack of literacy when it comes to social network tools. And the worst is… that the highest in the hierarchy, the worst literacy executives show!
    Internal training is mandatory- and needs to be accompanied by showing the value of the tools which are often looked upon in disdain by the elders!
    Literacy in social tools is definitely a must in the world of the Fourth Revolution. Hope that’ll start at school!

  • http://kkfmedia.com Kelly

    Great timing.  I have been asked to “teach” a small group of employees how to effectively use Social Media and how it can impact their business.  Ive been struggling with how to engage them and teach not only the great impact Social Media can have, but how it can hurt if ignored of not used correctly.

    • http://twitter.com/tombrownjr Tom Brown

      Kelly, I currently do presentations introducing Social Media to businesses.  I typically start with this 2 minute video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwmJ9CFBIks) on almost all of my presentations to get their attention.  It seems to get their attention fairly well.

      • http://kkfmedia.com Kelly

        This is great!  Thanks Tom

  • http://twitter.com/RyanCritchett Ryan Critchett

    Solid post. I can’t contribute information about large scale operations quite yet (yet) but I can definitely align with the simple and undeniable fact that people in your operation need to clearly understand things like company wide perspective on social, specific goals and how to consistently self correct. 

  • http://www.extremejohn.com Extreme John

    This is another excellent post about social media Amber. Social media marketers need to be aware of the importance of social media education and training. They are truly helpful for everyone in the business– active in social media or not– to see what social media can do and help for our business to grow. 

  • http://nateriggs.com nateriggs

    This is an excellent post, Amber.  Great case studies too. Seems like Dell is moving to get to total organizational rollout first. What do you think the reasonable timeline is until everyone is playing?

    Also, what other large companies aside from folks like Sprint and HR Block do you know of that are moving in the same direction? Any middle market players?

  • http://twitter.com/TonyLabsJr Tony Labs

    Ooohh, great information you write it very clean. I’m very lucky to get this details from you. ;-)

    Search the Internet we’re here

  • Al Pittampalli

    It’s great to see companies are finally realizing that social media are just a set of tools, it’s a strategy that generates real power.  Getting many people in the company involved is so much more effective…Zappos does a great job with this, allowing all their employees to publicly blog and tweet.

  • http://twitter.com/tombrownjr Tom Brown

    Great article Amber.  And this is something of a void that I have touched on in my presentations. I can definitely see the need for more of this for companies that want to get involved in Social Media.

  • Ann Ehnert

    Education is extremely important when you introduce these
    marketing ideas to a client that has never utilized social media or mobile
    marketing strategies in the past. At our agency we do provide a learning
    experience for those interested in online marketing, internet strategy and opportunities
    in mobile development. Organized as a lunch-and-learn, the best (and most
    important) part of the SteadyRain learning experience is knowing the audience
    can walk out of the room with new ideas they can implement at their
    organization.

    Ann
    SteadyRain
    http://www.steadyrain.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/GeroBrockschnieder Gero Brockschnieder

    Nice article! I am currently interested in the particular question whether Facebook will one day be able to push professional social networks like LinkedIn out of the way (I have written about that in http://snslurk.com/facebook-is-for-pleasure) which is maybe quite a small subtopic of this whole group of themes around social media and enterprises. Thankss for the great input, keep writing about this!

  • http://www.mynotetakingnerd.com/blog Lewis LaLanne aka Nerd #2

    Systems rock!

    Pretty much any process you have in your business can be improved by having a highest and best use systematic approach that everyone engaged in it, goes through. Social media is no different.

    Just hoping people will “Get it” and do it right is asking for disappointing results. This is cool to see them taking this so seriously! As a Dell customer I’m looking forward to see what comes of this.

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  • http://oopeducation.com OopEducation.com

    Thanks for sharing this awesome post ..
    http://oopeducation.com

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  • http://www.social2b.com media marketing

    I also agree that you cannot forse your employee advertice the company through social media. I think it’s better to have some kind of encouragement for those who will do that. But the problem is that the person who’s not good at it may spoil company’s reputation. And this is far more dangerous than we sometimes think… So, if you want your employees work at social media – make sure they know how to do that!
    Jenny

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